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Here’s What Your Favorite Coffee Drink Says About Your Personality

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plerudulier:

Coffee is serious business, don’t you laugh about it ;-)

Originally posted on TIME:

Sure, almost everybody likes coffee, but apparently how you like your coffee can reveal quite a bit about your personality. Coffee-crazed blogger Ryoko of I Love Coffee took the results from a recent study about the habits of coffee drinkers and put them into this infographic. It highlights the differences between those who opt for a simple black cup of joe versus those who spring for something a bit fancier.

These results might not be true for everyone, we know, so we recommend taking this with a grain of salt (or, uh, sugar.)

coffee_personality

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U.S. Promotes Network to Foil Digital Spying [NYTimes.com]

A group of academics and computer enthusiasts who took part in the 2011 uprising in Tunisia that overthrew a government deeply invested in digital surveillance have helped their town become a test case for an alternative: a physically separate, local network made up of cleverly programmed antennas scattered about on rooftops.

The State Department provided $2.8 million to a team of American hackers, community activists and software geeks to develop the system, called a mesh network, as a way for dissidents abroad to communicate more freely and securely than they can on the open Internet. One target that is sure to start debate is Cuba; the United States Agency for International Development has pledged $4.3 million to create mesh networks there.

via U.S. Promotes Network to Foil Digital Spying – NYTimes.com.

Confronting the Myth of the ‘Digital Native’ [chronicle.com]

Confronting the Myth of the 'Digital Native' - The Chronicle of Higher Education

When Kaitlin Jennrich first walked into her communications seminar last fall, she had no idea that the professor already knew of her affinity for pink cars and Olive Garden breadsticks­—and that she planned to share that knowledge with the class. It hadn’t taken much sleuthing on the professor’s part to uncover those inane nuggets. The 18-year-old freshman at Northwestern University had herself lobbed them into the public sphere, via Twitter.

Her reaction, she recalls, was, “Oh, no.”

“I realized the kind of image I was putting out there wasn’t the kind of image I wanted potential employers or professors to see,” says Ms. Jennrich, whose professional aspirations include sports public relations.

via Confronting the Myth of the ‘Digital Native’ – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Eerie Photos Of Abandoned Shopping Malls Show The Changing Face Of Suburbia [fastcoexist.com]

Eerie Photos Of Abandoned Shopping Malls Show The Changing Face Of Suburbia | Co.Exist | ideas + impact

When the sprawling Randall Park Mall opened near Cleveland in 1976, it was briefly the largest mall in the world, and developers touted it as a symbol of the good life in suburbia. The small town where it was located added two shopping bags to its municipal seal in homage. This year, after decades of decline, it’s being torn down.

Photographer Seph Lawless documented the abandoned mall, along with another nearby shopping center also scheduled for demolition, in a new book called Black Friday.

via Eerie Photos Of Abandoned Shopping Malls Show The Changing Face Of Suburbia | Co.Exist | ideas + impact.

How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 [NYTimes.com]

How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 - NYTimes.com

How do you write a good résumé?

“The key,” he said, “is to frame your strengths as: ‘I accomplished X, relative to Y, by doing Z.’ Most people would write a résumé like this: ‘Wrote editorials for The New York Times.’ Better would be to say: ‘Had 50 op-eds published compared to average of 6 by most op-ed [writers] as a result of providing deep insight into the following area for three years.’ Most people don’t put the right content on their résumés.”

via How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 – NYTimes.com.

Map reveals how the entire world could be connected using a global underground network [impactlab.net]

Such a project would need an almost unlimited budget and time to create tunnels long enough to cross the Atlantic, he added.

Super high-speed vehicles would also need to be developed in order to make a trip beneath the ocean comparable to taking a flight.

And then there are tectonic plates and enormous underwater mountain ranges to consider.

Mr Benaim said: ‘The idea of tunnelling under the ocean is probably not feasible because of the depth of abysses and tectonic plate boundaries. I suppose you could go round Greenland and the Arctic [to connect Europe with America].

His suggested solution to the Atlantic problem is quite simple, however.

‘Why should we imagine this map and network as an underground?’ he said.

He explained that a pneumatic tube similar to the grand plans for a 760mph (1,223km/h) ‘hyperloop’ in California might be more feasible.

via Map reveals how the entire world could be connected using a global underground network | Impact Lab.

Greed and the Wright Brothers [NYTimes.com]

Greed and the Wright Brothers - NYTimes.com

The Wright brothers’ critical insight was the importance of “lateral stability” — that is, wingtip-to-wingtip stability — to flight. And their great innovation was something they called “wing warping,” in which they used a series of pulleys that caused the wingtips on one side of the airplane to go up when the wingtips on the other side were pulled down. That allowed the Wrights’ airplane to make banked turns and to correct itself when it flew into a gust of wind.

But when the Wrights applied for a patent, they didn’t seek one that just covered wing warping; their patent covered any means to achieve lateral stability. There is no question what the Wrights sought: nothing less than a monopoly on the airplane business — every airplane ever manufactured, they believed, owed them a royalty

via Greed and the Wright Brothers – NYTimes.com.

Get Rich, Live Longer: The Ultimate Consequence of Income Inequality [theatlantic.com]

Get Rich, Live Longer: The Ultimate Consequence of Income Inequality - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic

We know a few things about money and life. We know that market wages (pre-tax, pre-transfer) are flat-lining or falling for middle- and lower-income Americans thanks to globalization, technology, marriage- and geographical sorting, the decline of unions, and other reasons. We know that poorer Americans live shorter lives and that poorer women live shortening lives. We don’t know the precise causal mechanism, but we know that the relationship is remarkably tight at every income level.

Get Rich, Live Longer: The Ultimate Consequence of Income Inequality – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic.

The Limits of Big Data: A Review of Social Physics by Alex Pentland [technologyreview.com]

In 1969, Playboy published a long, freewheeling interview with Marshall McLuhan in which the media theorist and sixties icon sketched a portrait of the future that was at once seductive and repellent. Noting the ability of digital computers to analyze data and communicate messages, he predicted that the machines eventually would be deployed to fine-tune society’s workings. “The computer can be used to direct a network of global thermostats to pattern life in ways that will optimize human awareness,” he said. “Already, it’s technologically feasible to employ the computer to program societies in beneficial ways.” He acknowledged that such centralized control raised the specter of “brainwashing, or far worse,” but he stressed that “the programming of societies could actually be conducted quite constructively and humanistically.”

via The Limits of Big Data: A Review of Social Physics by Alex Pentland | MIT Technology Review.

Inventive Games That Teach Kids About Empathy and Social Skills [blogs.kqed.org/mindshift]

Play is nothing if not social. Games organize play, allowing us to wrangle and experiment with the world. When we play games, more often than not, it’s us under the microscope.

Video games, however, have been a bit of an aberration in the history of play and games. Many of them have been solitary experiences. That’s changing, though. We’re in the midst of a multiplayer video game renaissance that’s bringing people together. Equally exciting is the trend in design toward video games that build social skills and encourage players to reflect on themselves and their relationships. Here are a few games that do just that.

via Inventive Games That Teach Kids About Empathy and Social Skills | MindShift.

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