Archive by Author | plerudulier

How Gmail Happened: The Inside Story of Its Launch 10 Years Ago Today

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plerudulier:

Almost at that time did I decide to jump ship and change from Yahoo! email to Gmail.

Originally posted on TIME:

If you wanted to pick a single date to mark the beginning of the modern era of the web, you could do a lot worse than choosing Thursday, April 1, 2004, the day Gmail launched.

Scuttlebutt that Google was about to offer a free email service had leaked out the day before: Here’s John Markoff of the New York Timesreporting on it at the time. But the idea of the search kingpin doing email was still startling, and the alleged storage capacity of 1GB—500 times what Microsoft’s Hotmail offered—seemed downright implausible. So when Google issued a press release date-stamped April 1, an awful lot of people briefly took it to be a really good hoax. (Including me.)

Gmail turned out to be real, and revolutionary. And a decade’s worth of perspective only makes it look more momentous.

The first true landmark service to emerge from Google…

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Creating An iPad Workflow For Teachers, Students, And Parents – TeachThought

plerudulier:

need to give this a test

Originally posted on Flexibility Enables Learning:

See on Scoop.itCurtin iPad User Group

“Using tablets in the classroom?whether iPads, Androids, or surging Windows devices?is largely a matter of workflow.

If you can forgive a mixed metaphor, the traditional classroom sees the teacher as the both the director and the bottleneck of all productivity. They create assignments, assess proficiency, respond to assessment data, and refine planned instruction in light of constantly changing circumstances.

This is challenging in any context, but in 1:1 and mobile learning environments, it?s even more complex. With tablets, every student has both an information portal and a digital printing press. This means they can reach both communities and potential collaborators.

The above graphic from @ipadwellsaddresses this issue with a helpful graphic that visualizes a workflow, while offering up representative apps for each step of the process.”

See on www.teachthought.com

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Sketch Your Infographics

Originally posted on KAP. Design Blog:

Concept sketch for CBaSE information graphic by KAP Design

Early conceptual sketch for ‘Centre for Business and Social Entrepreneurship Overview’ information graphic by KAP Design. Click to view larger.

First things first. When designing information graphics, focus on the ‘information’ before diving into the ‘graphics’. The success of an infographic rests on the quality of the story.

When it comes time to create the ‘visual’ in visual storytelling, it’s time to sketch. But wait! Don’t turn to your computer or tablet just yet. While many infographics are beautiful, vector graphic, visual assets, you should begin with paper, pens, markers, pencils, and more paper.

ABO concept sketch by KAP Design

Early conceptual sketch for ‘ArtsBuild Ontario’ information graphic by KAP Design.

Sketching is the perfect technology for creating your infographic concepts and sketches are ideal for sharing them with collaborators and clients.

Sketching Is Fast

When a designer is brainstorming alone or with others, ideas are rapidly flowing and transforming. Anything that slows down the process…

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If Cars Really Could Drive Themselves, How Many Would We Need? – Rebecca J. Rosen [theatlantic.com]

If Cars Really Could Drive Themselves, How Many Would We Need? - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic

If self-driving cars become a reliable, safe, legal technology, here’s a vision of what cities may someday look like.

There are no downtown parking lots or parking lanes.

There is no mall parking, no grocery-store parking, no airport parking.

There are no home garages where your car sits unused whenever you’re home. In fact, you probably won’t own a car at all.

Instead, you’ll just request a ride (presumably on an app), and a car will appear at your doorstep. Once it drops you off, it’ll turn to the next request.  If there are none nearby, it may be rerouted to areas where demand is anticipated soon (say downtown before the evening rush), put to use delivering lunches or Amazon.com orders, or sent to a large open lot in the suburbs where it will wait to be beckoned.

via If Cars Really Could Drive Themselves, How Many Would We Need? – Rebecca J. Rosen – The Atlantic.

Which of Your Twitter Followers Really Matter? Here’s How to Find Out [Inc.com]

Which of Your Twitter Followers Really Matter? Here's How to Find Out | Inc.com

Just over a month ago, Alex Taub and Michael Schonfeld launched SocialRank, a startup that has developed a Twitter tool for brands. Though the product is one in a long line of social media analytics tools–which includes Topsy, 33Across, and Brandwatch, to name a few–it helps brands answer one very important question.

SocialRank “tells you one really simple thing: not what your followers are talking about on Twitter, but who they are,” Taub says.

via Which of Your Twitter Followers Really Matter? Here’s How to Find Out | Inc.com.

Employee Engagement: Is There a Strategic Advantage?

Originally posted on nancyrubin:

According to a recent Gallup study , worldwide, only 13% of employees are engaged at work. In a 142-country study on the State of the Global Workplace, about one in eight workers — roughly 180 million employees in the countries studied — are psychologically committed to their jobs and likely to be making positive contributions to their organizations.

Companies that understand the value of employee engagement know that motivating high performance and aligning talent with business strategy requires getting to the heart of what matters to employees. Employee engagement is largely about social connections happening in organizations and aligning work experiences with employees’ cultural needs.

How do the best places to work succeed at employee engagement?

  • They understand what employees are thinking.
  • They create an intentional culture.
  • They demonstrate appreciation for contributions big and small.
  • They commit to open, honest communication.
  • They support career path development.
  • They engage in social…

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Japanese women and work: Holding back half the nation [economist.com]

KAREN KAWABATA represents the best of Japan’s intellectual capital. She has just graduated from the University of Tokyo, the most prestigious in the country. Wry and poised, with an American mother and Japanese father, she has the languages and cosmopolitan attitude that Japanese companies particularly value nowadays. In April she will join McKinsey, a consultancy that should give her immediate membership of a globe-trotting elite.

Yet Ms Kawabata sees obstacles in her path. She is acutely aware of the difficulties she would face at traditional Japanese companies, should she find herself joining one. Ferociously long working hours, often stretching past midnight, are followed by sessions of “nominication”, a play on the Japanese word for drinking, nomu, and the English word “communication”; these are where young hopefuls forge connections and build reputations. Nowadays women trying to impress the boss are allowed to drink plum wine mixed with plenty of soda instead of beer, says Ms Kawabata. But that is hardly a great improvement.

via Japanese women and work: Holding back half the nation | The Economist.

Piketty’s Inequality Story in Six Charts [newyorker.com]

Fifteen or twenty years ago, debates about inequality tended to be cast in terms of clever but complicated statistics, such as the Gini coefficient and the Theil entropy index, which attempted to reduce the entire income distribution to a single number. One thing that Piketty and his colleagues Emmanuel Saez and Anthony Atkinson have done is to popularize the use of simple charts that are easier to understand. In particular, they present pictures showing the shares of over-all income and wealth taken by various groups over time, including the top decile of the income distribution and the top percentile (respectively, the top ten per cent and those we call “the one per cent”).

The Piketty group didn’t invent this way of looking at things. Other economists, such as Ed Wolff, of New York University, and Jared Bernstein and Larry Mishel, the creators of the invaluable State of Working America series, have long used similar charts and tables in their publications. But partly by using new sources of data, such as individual tax records, and partly by expanding the research to other countries, Piketty and his colleagues have deployed their charts to reshape the entire inequality debate.

via Piketty’s Inequality Story in Six Charts : The New Yorker.

The Electronic Holy War [newyorker.com]

In May, 1997, I.B.M.’s Deep Blue supercomputer prevailed over Garry Kasparov in a series of six chess games, becoming the first computer to defeat a world-champion chess player. Two months later, the Times offered machines another challenge on behalf of a wounded humanity: the two-thousand-year-old Chinese board game wei qi, known in the West as Go. The article said that computers had little chance of success: “It may be a hundred years before a computer beats humans at Go—maybe even longer.”

Last March, sixteen years later, a computer program named Crazy Stone defeated Yoshio Ishida, a professional Go player and a five-time Japanese champion.

via The Electronic Holy War : The New Yorker.

A New Breed of Wearables Will Give You Data You Can Actually Use [Wired.com]

Motion capture isn’t new, of course. The Wii and Kinect first introduced the technology on a mass scale in our living rooms. But the Kinect and Wii work by using larger sensors spaced out in a room — infrared projectors, cameras, accelerometers and IR detection, all feeding back to a base unit where the heavy data processing takes place. Some of today’s wearables are capable of performing motion capture and data crunching on par with the Wii — and even bettering it in some cases — but in a form factor smaller than a credit card.

via A New Breed of Wearables Will Give You Data You Can Actually Use | Gadget Lab | Wired.com.

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