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How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 [NYTimes.com]

How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 - NYTimes.com

How do you write a good résumé?

“The key,” he said, “is to frame your strengths as: ‘I accomplished X, relative to Y, by doing Z.’ Most people would write a résumé like this: ‘Wrote editorials for The New York Times.’ Better would be to say: ‘Had 50 op-eds published compared to average of 6 by most op-ed [writers] as a result of providing deep insight into the following area for three years.’ Most people don’t put the right content on their résumés.”

via How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 – NYTimes.com.

Inventive Games That Teach Kids About Empathy and Social Skills [blogs.kqed.org/mindshift]

Play is nothing if not social. Games organize play, allowing us to wrangle and experiment with the world. When we play games, more often than not, it’s us under the microscope.

Video games, however, have been a bit of an aberration in the history of play and games. Many of them have been solitary experiences. That’s changing, though. We’re in the midst of a multiplayer video game renaissance that’s bringing people together. Equally exciting is the trend in design toward video games that build social skills and encourage players to reflect on themselves and their relationships. Here are a few games that do just that.

via Inventive Games That Teach Kids About Empathy and Social Skills | MindShift.

How a Student Used Lego to Build the Ultimate Resume [mashable.com]

In the job hunt, you need to build a strong résumé.

Leah Bowman used Lego to construct the ultimate first impression on her search. Lego played a large part in Bowman’s childhood growing up Danish, so she was inspired to use the Lego Digital Designer to create a brick version of herself.

via How a Student Used Lego to Build the Ultimate Resume.

If a MOOC instructor moves, who keeps the intellectual property rights? [insidehighered.com]

When faculty members move from one institution to the next, so do their courses, but after having spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to prepare those courses to a massive audience, are universities entitled to a share of the rights?

The question has so far gone unanswered (though not undiscussed) even at some of the earliest entrants into the massive open online course market, including Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since MOOC providers have gotten out of the intellectual property rights debate by saying they will honor whatever policy their institutional partners have in place, it falls on the universities to settle the matter.

via If a MOOC instructor moves, who keeps the intellectual property rights? | Inside Higher Ed.

Why we see bosses as parents [FT.com]

When people close their front door in the morning and think they have left their families behind them for a simpler life at work, they are often mistaken. Our families, particularly our earliest relationships, live inside our minds and find their way into all our subsequent relationships, including those in the workplace.

It is in our earliest relationships that we learn how to form alliances, to survive conflict, resolve arguments and be included in groups and avoid exclusion – all interpersonal skills essential to managing office life. When families have failed in teaching these skills, work relationships – and potentially people’s careers – can suffer.

via Why we see bosses as parents – FT.com.

Data Mining Exposes Embarrassing Problems for Massive Open Online Courses [technologyreview.com]

It wasn’t so long ago that the excitement surrounding online education reached fever pitch. Various researchers offering free online versions of their university classes found they could attract vast audiences of high quality students from all over the world. The obvious next step was to offer far more of these online classes.

That started a rapid trend and various organisations sprung up to offer online versions of university-level courses that anyone with an Internet connection could sign up for. The highest profile of these are organisations such as Coursera, Udacity, and edX.

But this new golden age of education has rapidly lost its lustre.

via Data Mining Exposes Embarrassing Problems for Massive Open Online Courses | MIT Technology Review.

States Want Kids To Learn A Lot — Maybe Too Much [npr.org]

Jean Leising admits she’s no expert on brain development, but she still hopes to do something about the way kids learn.

Leising serves in the Indiana state Senate. Last month, she convinced her Senate colleagues to pass a bill that would restore instruction of cursive writing to the state’s educational standards — the set of skills and knowledge kids are expected to master in each grade level.

Even in the email age, teaching cursive might be a great thing. But when legislatures impose mandates on instruction, professional educators get nervous.

It’s not just controversial topics such as creationism, which is still a matter of debate in states such as Texas, Louisiana and Missouri. When legislators insist that students master certain material, whether it’s a specific historical event or a set of writing or math skills, it can interfere with the overall program that schools are guiding kids through.

“If you have too many cooks throwing too much decontextualized content into K-12 standards, they can very quickly become overwhelmed,” says Kathleen Porter-Magee, a policy fellow at the Fordham Institute, a conservative education think tank.

via States Want Kids To Learn A Lot — Maybe Too Much : NPR.

Learning at the Speed of Links and Conversations [blog.changeagentsworldwide.com]

The use of search engines, databases, platforms, and spaces for collaborative exploration and exchange has exploded into our personal and collective world. Both real-time and asynchronous connection combined with effective technologies for compressing the bits that drive/carry audio and video have enabled inexpensive and effective telepresence. We’re transitioning into an era of “conversations” from which we extract useful information and knowledge, whilst time and space are being altered in front of our faces.

Arguably the capabilities offered by these new tools and the conditions they generate are having deep impact upon how, why, where, and when we learn. I think it’s “how” we learn that is the most important focus or issue for these early days of a new set of conditions rapidly becoming ubiquitous.

via Learning at the Speed of Links and Conversations.

How to Build a Better Educational System: Jigsaw Classrooms [apa.org]

In the early 1970s, in the wake of the civil rights movement, educators were faced with a social dilemma that had no obvious solution. All over the country, well-intentioned efforts to desegregate America\’s public schools were leading to serious problems. Ethnic minority children, most of whom had previously attended severely under-funded schools, found themselves in classrooms composed predominantly of more privileged White children. This created a situation in which students from affluent backgrounds often shone brilliantly while students from impoverished backgrounds often struggled. Of course, this difficult situation seemed to confirm age-old stereotypes: that Blacks and Latinos are stupid or lazy and that Whites are pushy and overly competitive. The end result was strained relations between children from different ethnic groups and widening gaps in the academic achievement of Whites and minorities.

Drawing on classic psychological research on how to reduce tensions between competing groups (e.g., see Allport, 1954; Sherif, 1958; see also Pettigrew, 1998), Elliot Aronson and colleagues realized that one of the major reasons for this problem was the competitive nature of the typical classroom.

via How to Build a Better Educational System: Jigsaw Classrooms.

How online gamers are solving science’s biggest problems | Technology | The Observer

For all their virtual accomplishments, gamers aren\’t feted for their real-world usefulness. But that perception might be about to change, thanks to a new wave of games that let players with little or no scientific knowledge tackle some of science\’s biggest problems. And gamers are already proving their worth.

In 2011, people playing Foldit, an online puzzle game about protein folding, resolved the structure of an enzyme that causes an Aids-like disease in monkeys. Researchers had been working on the problem for 13 years. The gamers solved it in three weeks.

A year later, people playing an astronomy game called Planet Hunters found a curious planet with four stars in its system, and to date, they\’ve discovered 40 planets that could potentially support life, all of which had been previously missed by professional astronomers.

On paper, gamers and scientists make a bizarre union. But in reality, their two worlds aren\’t leagues apart: both involve solving problems within a given set of rules.

via How online gamers are solving science’s biggest problems | Technology | The Observer.

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