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How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 [NYTimes.com]

How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 - NYTimes.com

How do you write a good résumé?

“The key,” he said, “is to frame your strengths as: ‘I accomplished X, relative to Y, by doing Z.’ Most people would write a résumé like this: ‘Wrote editorials for The New York Times.’ Better would be to say: ‘Had 50 op-eds published compared to average of 6 by most op-ed [writers] as a result of providing deep insight into the following area for three years.’ Most people don’t put the right content on their résumés.”

via How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 – NYTimes.com.

How a Student Used Lego to Build the Ultimate Resume [mashable.com]

In the job hunt, you need to build a strong résumé.

Leah Bowman used Lego to construct the ultimate first impression on her search. Lego played a large part in Bowman’s childhood growing up Danish, so she was inspired to use the Lego Digital Designer to create a brick version of herself.

via How a Student Used Lego to Build the Ultimate Resume.

Why we see bosses as parents [FT.com]

When people close their front door in the morning and think they have left their families behind them for a simpler life at work, they are often mistaken. Our families, particularly our earliest relationships, live inside our minds and find their way into all our subsequent relationships, including those in the workplace.

It is in our earliest relationships that we learn how to form alliances, to survive conflict, resolve arguments and be included in groups and avoid exclusion – all interpersonal skills essential to managing office life. When families have failed in teaching these skills, work relationships – and potentially people’s careers – can suffer.

via Why we see bosses as parents – FT.com.

Why leadership-development programs fail [mckinsey.com]

fbexternal-a.akamaihd.net

For years, organizations have lavished time and money on improving the capabilities of managers and on nurturing new leaders. US companies alone spend almost $14 billion annually on leadership development.1 Colleges and universities offer hundreds of degree courses on leadership, and the cost of customized leadership-development offerings from a top business school can reach $150,000 a person.

Moreover, when upward of 500 executives were asked to rank their top three human-capital priorities, leadership development was included as both a current and a future priority. Almost two-thirds of the respondents identified leadership development as their number-one concern.2 Only 7 percent of senior managers polled by a UK business school think that their companies develop global leaders effectively,3 and around 30 percent of US companies admit that they have failed to exploit their international business opportunities fully because they lack enough leaders with the right capabilities.4

We’ve talked with hundreds of chief executives about the struggle, observing both successful initiatives and ones that run into the sand. In the process, we’ve identified four of the most common mistakes. Here we explain some tips to overcome them. Together, they suggest ways for companies to get more from their leadership-development efforts—and ultimately their leaders—as these organizations face challenges ranging from the next demanding phase of globalization to disruptive technological change and continued macroeconomic uncertainty.

via Why leadership-development programs fail | McKinsey & Company.

TED Talks Customized for Corporate America [Businessweek]

Last November, State Street (STT) introduced a new team-building exercise: The financial-services company hosted its own TED event, modeled on the conference series that promises “riveting talks by remarkable people.”

While TED speakers have included big names such as Bill Gates and Sheryl Sandberg, State Street drew upon its own pool of about 30,000 employees. “We had people from all geographies and all levels of the company,” says Hannah Grove, State Street’s chief marketing officer, who came up with the idea.

Run by the nonprofit Sapling Foundation, TED started out in 1984 as a one-off event. Its mission: to help spread ideas and bring together experts in technology, entertainment, and design.

via TED Talks Customized for Corporate America – Businessweek.

The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence [Adam Grant for The Atlantic]

Since the 1995 publication of Daniel Goleman’s bestseller, emotional intelligence has been touted by leaders, policymakers, and educators as the solution to a wide range of social problems. If we can teach our children to manage emotions, the argument goes, we’ll have less bullying and more cooperation. If we can cultivate emotional intelligence among leaders and doctors, we’ll have more caring workplaces and more compassionate healthcare. As a result, emotional intelligence is now taught widely in secondary schools, business schools, and medical schools.

Emotional intelligence is important, but the unbridled enthusiasm has obscured a dark side. New evidence shows that when people hone their emotional skills, they become better at manipulating others. When you’re good at controlling your own emotions, you can disguise your true feelings. When you know what others are feeling, you can tug at their heartstrings and motivate them to act against their own best interests.

Social scientists have begun to document this dark side of emotional intelligence. In emerging research led by University of Cambridge professor Jochen Menges, when a leader gave an inspiring speech filled with emotion, the audience was less likely to scrutinize the message and remembered less of the content. Ironically, audience members were so moved by the speech that they claimed to recall more of it.

via The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence – Adam Grant – The Atlantic.

Technology didn’t kill middle class jobs, public policy did [@DeanBaker13 4 theguardian.com]

A widely held view in elite circles is that the rapid rise in inequality in the United States over the last three decades is an unfortunate side-effect of technological progress. In this story, technology has had the effect of eliminating tens of millions of middle wage jobs for factory workers, bookkeepers, and similar occupations.

These were jobs where people with limited education used to be able to raise a family with a middle class standard of living. However computers, robots and other technological innovations are rapidly reducing the need for such work. As a result, the remaining jobs in these sectors are likely to pay less and many people who would have otherwise worked at middle wage jobs must instead crowd into the lower paying sectors of the labor market.

This story is comforting to elites, because it means that inequality is something that happened, not something they did. They won out because they had the skills and intelligence to succeed in a dynamic economy, whereas the huge mass of workers that are falling behind did not. In this story, the best we can do for those left behind is empathy and education. We can increase opportunities to upgrade their skills in the hope that more of them may be able to join the winners.

That\’s a nice story, but the evidence doesn\’t support it.

via Technology didn’t kill middle class jobs, public policy did | Dean Baker | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Beneath the chatter about the Future Of Work lies a discontinuity [@stoweboyd 4 Gigaom.com]

Beneath the chatter about the Future Of Work lies a discontinuity — Gigaom Research

Instead of conceptualizing the company as broken into managed units, with managers leading each unit and subordinates doing their piecework, we need to conceive of the company as a world — an ecology — built-up from each individual connecting to other individuals. And stringing these together into an interconnected whole involves associations like sets, and discernible elements like scenes, but increasingly, nothing like brigades and squads.

[...]

We will see more cooperative work, supported by loosely connected, small and simple apps, a break with the model of enterprise software vendors.  Broadly-conceived one-size-fits-all ‘collaborative’ software solutions will increasingly be viewed as something like the obligation to wear a company uniform to work rather than something to unleash creativity, cooperation, and innovation.

Personal note : it is the case already, this isn’t the future this is the present.

via Beneath the chatter about the Future Of Work lies a discontinuity — Gigaom Research.

Online CV is good, maximising its visibility is better

See on Scoop.itThings I Grab (Here and There): THgsIGrbHT

I once wrote about the other CV one could build, on account of extra skills one acquires along one’s professionnal life. I also wrote about using one’s email (in my case gmail) as, also, an online bookmarking service. The idea behind the latter is this: using a service not only for what it’s meant to primarily provide but also for what it could do as well (with the supplementary advantage to not having to create yet another account on yet another plateform).

See on plerudulier.wordpress.com

My job, if I’d imagine it ideally | Mon travail, si je l’imaginais idéalement

See on Scoop.itThings I Grab (Here and There): THgsIGrbHT

Of course I’m not fantasising anything that would not be realistic – if only because last I checked I wasn’t even close to looking like L.Evangelista⊃1; – only what one can truly believe is within one’s reach, maybe a bit beyond even.

plerudulier‘s insight:

Bien sûr je ne suis pas en train de fantasmer sur ce qui ne serait pas réaliste – ne serait-ce parce que la dernière fois que j’ai vérifié j’étais loin d’approcher L.Evangelista⊃1; – seulement ce que d’aucuns peuvent réellement croire atteignable, peut-être même un peu au-delà.

See on plerudulier.wordpress.com

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