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Machine learning versus AI: what’s the difference?

Thanks to the likes of Google, Amazon, and Facebook, the terms artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning have become much more widespread than ever before. They are often used interchangeably and promise all sorts from smarter home appliances to robots taking our jobs.

The UK has a new AI centre – so when robots kill, we know who to blame The UK has a new AI centre – so when robots kill, we know who to blameArtificial Intelligence 12 Oct 2016.

But while AI and machine learning are very much related, they are not quite the same thing. AI is a branch of computer science attempting to build machines capable of intelligent behaviour, while 
Stanford University defines machine learning as “the science of getting computers to act without being explicitly programmed”. 

You need AI researchers to build the smart machines, but you need machine learning experts to make them truly intelligent.

Source: Machine learning versus AI: what’s the difference?

Moving Beyond MOOCs: Experiments in Non-traditional Product Education by Julia Wilkowski [learningsolutionsmag.com]

The engineering education team’s staff meeting on May 2, 2012 began like any other: reports of new engineer orientation, computer science outreach efforts, and an updated mission statement: “To provide Google engineers and the world with relevant and timely technical content, learning resources, and tools.”

With five minutes remaining in the meeting, the director announced that she was recruiting team members who were willing to tackle an audacious goal: create an online course for ten million people in eight weeks. Many of us left the room that day with more questions than answers: Could we really create a course from scratch for that many people? In only eight weeks? What would we teach, and why? How would we know if we were successful?

via Moving Beyond MOOCs: Experiments in Non-traditional Product Education by Julia Wilkowski : Learning Solutions Magazine.

If a MOOC instructor moves, who keeps the intellectual property rights? [insidehighered.com]

When faculty members move from one institution to the next, so do their courses, but after having spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to prepare those courses to a massive audience, are universities entitled to a share of the rights?

The question has so far gone unanswered (though not undiscussed) even at some of the earliest entrants into the massive open online course market, including Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since MOOC providers have gotten out of the intellectual property rights debate by saying they will honor whatever policy their institutional partners have in place, it falls on the universities to settle the matter.

via If a MOOC instructor moves, who keeps the intellectual property rights? | Inside Higher Ed.

Data Mining Exposes Embarrassing Problems for Massive Open Online Courses [technologyreview.com]

It wasn’t so long ago that the excitement surrounding online education reached fever pitch. Various researchers offering free online versions of their university classes found they could attract vast audiences of high quality students from all over the world. The obvious next step was to offer far more of these online classes.

That started a rapid trend and various organisations sprung up to offer online versions of university-level courses that anyone with an Internet connection could sign up for. The highest profile of these are organisations such as Coursera, Udacity, and edX.

But this new golden age of education has rapidly lost its lustre.

via Data Mining Exposes Embarrassing Problems for Massive Open Online Courses | MIT Technology Review.

Learning at the Speed of Links and Conversations [blog.changeagentsworldwide.com]

The use of search engines, databases, platforms, and spaces for collaborative exploration and exchange has exploded into our personal and collective world. Both real-time and asynchronous connection combined with effective technologies for compressing the bits that drive/carry audio and video have enabled inexpensive and effective telepresence. We’re transitioning into an era of “conversations” from which we extract useful information and knowledge, whilst time and space are being altered in front of our faces.

Arguably the capabilities offered by these new tools and the conditions they generate are having deep impact upon how, why, where, and when we learn. I think it’s “how” we learn that is the most important focus or issue for these early days of a new set of conditions rapidly becoming ubiquitous.

via Learning at the Speed of Links and Conversations.

Higher education: The attack of the MOOCs [The Economist]

DOTCOM mania was slow in coming to higher education, but now it has the venerable industry firmly in its grip. Since the launch early last year of Udacity and Coursera, two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete. Meanwhile, the MOOCs have multiplied in number, resources and student recruitment—without yet having figured out a business model of their own.

via Higher education: The attack of the MOOCs | The Economist.

MOOCs Are Largely Reaching Privileged Learners, Survey Finds – Wired Campus – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Penn researchers sent the survey to students who had registered for a MOOC and viewed at least one video lecture. More than 80 percent of the respondents had a two- or four-year degree, and 44 percent had some graduate education.

The pattern was true not only of MOOC students in the United States but also learners in other countries. In some foreign countries where MOOCs are popular, such as Brazil, China, India, Russia, and South Africa, “80 percent of MOOC students come from the wealthiest and most well educated 6 percent of the population,” according to the paper.

In other developing countries, about 80 percent of the MOOC students surveyed already held college degrees—a number staggeringly out of proportion with the share of degree holders in the general population.

“The individuals the MOOC revolution is supposed to help the most—those without access to higher education in developing countries—are underrepresented among the early adopters,” write the paper’s six authors.

via MOOCs Are Largely Reaching Privileged Learners, Survey Finds – Wired Campus – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

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