Archive by Author | plerudulier

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Photos From the Ruins

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Originally posted on TIME:

One scene shared by all of the 20th century’s bloodiest conflicts might have been lifted straight from The Road Warrior, or a Beckett play: spectral landscape; buildings obliterated; blasted trees; lifeless wasteland. The photographs in this gallery, for instance—pictures that starkly reference every bleak, war-battered panorama from Gettysburg to Verdun to Stalingrad to Chosin Reservoir to Pork Chop Hill—were made in September, 1945, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.

But far from chronicling the aftermath of a sustained, slogging campaign, these pictures—none of which were published in LIFE magazine—depict the devastation produced in a few unspeakably violent seconds. Here, presents pictures from both cities taken in the weeks and months following the bombings—bombings that killed a combined 120,000 people outright, and tens of thousands more through injury and radiation sickness. Included, as well, are scans of typed memos from photographer Bernard Hoffman—quietly revelatory notes like the one he wrote…

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What Do the Poor Need? Try Asking Them – ©[] by @davidkirp

FOR decades, policy makers have treated poverty as a sign of helplessness and ineptitude. The worse off the neighborhood — the higher the rate of poverty, crime, and juvenile delinquency — the less influence it would have over its future. Social service agencies conducted “needs assessments” rather than asking residents what would strengthen their community. Government agencies or private entrepreneurs then delivered brick-and-mortar solutions — a new school, medical clinic or housing.

It seldom worked. Take Baltimore, which has been “renewed” again and again. Two decades ago, more than $130 million was poured into the neighborhood where the arrest of Freddie Gray sparked riots last spring. The vision was grand — more than a thousand homes were built or renovated; education and health services were introduced — but the jobs disappeared and the drug trade continued to flourish.

David L. Kirp

Education and inequality.

via What Do the Poor Need? Try Asking Them – The New York Times.

How Gulf Countries Can Ignite Their Startup Revolution

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Originally posted on TechCrunch:

[tc_contributor_byline slug=”vineet-c-nambiar”]

There is hardly a day that passes without a new major initiative, announcement or bold proclamation by the Gulf economies of United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia to promote tech startups in the region. Be it incubators, investment funds or free zones, you name it and they have it.

Gulf countries have been trying (without much success) for the last few years to develop a startup-fueled digital economy — primarily to create another engine for growth to offset the dependence on oil and gas. Secondly, to create more avenues for private-sector job creation for its citizens who are presently almost exclusively employed in the government sector.

What’s Holding Up The Gulf Startup Revolution?

When we visualize an Internet economy, the obvious image that the mind conjures is Silicon Valley!

With all the multi-billion dollar surpluses, you would be forgiven to believe that a Silicon Valley was around the corner or…

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Is This the Happiest Photo Ever Made?

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Originally posted on TIME:

The sad destiny of countless great photographs is that, as the decades pass, the pictures are increasingly in danger of losing their ability to stun, shock, inspire, delight. In short, to move us. We’ve seen them reproduced so many times—in books, on postcards, in gallery and museum shows—that the images can sometimes assume that most staid and harmless of traits: they become familiar.

And when has the familiar stunned, shocked, inspired or delighted anyone?

It’s worthwhile, then, to occasionally make the effort to step back and try to experience famous photographs as if encountering them for the first time. The question then becomes: Are we capable of seeing—really seeing, with wholly fresh eyes—the most celebrated, readily identifiable pictures ever made?

Take the photograph featured here. Most of us have come upon it many, many times throughout our lives. But when was the last time any of us really saw it?…

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Generation X gets really old: How do slackers have a midlife crisis? ► []

In the 1993 movie “Falling Down,” Michael Douglas plays an angry white man whose midlife crisis has him nearly foaming at the mouth. Appalled by a brutal traffic jam and disorienting changes in his world, he flips out in a Korean liquor store, tangles with the homeless and construction workers, amassing an arsenal as he tries to make his way across town. His breakdown leaves casualties, makes the news — everyone notices. An eloquent latter-day equivalent, Noah Baumbach’s “Greenberg,” shows a meltdown going differently: The protagonist’s moment of crisis: Shrouded in an oversize ski vest, he wanders alone, quiet and pathetic, existentially lost on the edges of a party. Even his best friends don’t notice.

via Generation X gets really old: How do slackers have a midlife crisis? –

Great lies of our time: “journalists and coders should sit together to create amazing stuff” (updated)

Originally posted on The Overspill: when there's more that I want to say:

The Thomson Reuters newsroom. Note papers stacked all over the place. No idea if journalists and developers “sit together” here – but I’d bet they don’t. Photo by Targuman on Flickr.

I keep seeing people saying “you know how journalism and the internet can work better? Have the news org’s journalists and coders sit beside each other. Wonderful things will happen.”

Postscript, but at the top: this post generated a lot of reaction – so be sure to read the followup, which pulls together the many people saying that it can and does work./Postscript.

Let me tell you: when someone spins you this line, it’s pure unadulterated 100% bullshit. Anyone who says this has never looked at what happens when you do this, or considered the differences in work patterns between the two. (It pains me to point out that Wolfgang Blau is only the latest to suggest…

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Formation 3.0 est un blog dédié à la formation, à l'éducation, à l'emploi des nouvelles technologies dans l'enseignement et à la pensée visuelle.


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Another dot in the blogosphere?

I am an edu-explorer. I promise to walk on the edge of reason and let you know what I see. I use this blog to think out loud. If this promotes informal sharing and learning on technology integration issues, thank serendipity!


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